Jan 17, 2014

Former Italian / American Player: Bob Ramazzotti (1946/ 1948-1953)

Bob Ramazzotti was born on January 16th, 1917 in Elanora Pennsylvania. The five foot eight, right hand hitting infielder graduated from high school & played local city ball. There he was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1940. He would have some setbacks before reaching the major leagues.

First he went off to serve in World War II for three years from 1942-1945, serving as a sergeant in the Army's infantry division.

In 1946 he was brought up to the Brooklyn Dodgers when Cookie Lavagetto got inured & remained on the club when Eddie Stanky got injured. He made his debut in a game against the New York Giants as a defensive replacement on April 20th 1946. He hit just .208 that year in 62 games, as the Dodgers finished second to the Cardinals by two games.

Then in 1947, while playing minor league ball he suffered a severe beaning that affected the rest of his career. During a night game in Columbus Ohio, he was hit in the temple with a fast ball & lie on the field for twenty minutes until an ambulance arrived. He was listed in serious condition suffering from a triple fracture to the skull. He eventually had to have blood clot removed which formed in his brain. The operation was successful, saving his life.

He returned to play four games at the big league level in 1948 but Injuries would continue to haunt him. In May 1949 he was traded to the Chicago Cubs, as Brooklyn went on to win a pennant that year & the Cubs finished in eighth place.

Ramazzotti spent four years in Chicago, hitting a best .284 in 1952 playing in 50 games. In a seven year career he batted .230 with 4 HRs 22 doubles 53 RBIs & a 271 on base %. He was a solid infielder that played second (126 games) third (82 games) & short stop (66 games).

Retirement: After baseball he worked in a ball bearing factory in Pennsylvania for twenty years. He also ran a sandwich shop with his wife, worked in a bowling alley & helped out in his brothers billiards hall.

In 1999 he came to New York & joined in the festivities with players from the 1949 World Series who were celebrating its 50th anniversary. He passed away in 2000 at age 83.

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