Mar 8, 2017

Former Mets Coach: Barry Foote (1991-1992)

Barry Clifton Foote was born February 16th 1952 in Smithfield, North Carolina. He was ths son of minor league pitcher Amby Foote who played from 1948-1954.

At 18 years old, the highly touted catcher Barry, was the number one draft pick (third pick overall) for the Montreal Expos in 1970. By 1972 he became the Eastern League MVP, in a year when the Expos had a pretty good looking future. Expo manager Gene Mauch, believed in Foote so much he labeled him the next Johnny Bench.

In 1974 he replaced John Bocobella as the main catcher, he went on to lead all catchers in assists (83) & led the league in sac flies (12) while batting .262 with 11 HRs & 60 RBIs in 125 games, earning a Topps All Star Rookie award. The expectations were so high for Foote, that the Expos actually moved rookie star Gary Carter to the outfield.

Trivia: According to former team mate, Warren Cromarte, Carter earned his name 'Kid" when Expo pitcher Don Carrithers use to tease Foote that that young "kid" Carter, had another good day at the plate in the minor leagues & was coming up to take his job.

Eventually Foote suffered a knee injury & shared time with Carter. By 1977 Carter would take over the catching job going all the way to the Hall of Fame. Foote led all catchers in double plays in 1975 & 1976 but his hitting declined. He batted .194 in 1975 & then .234 the next year,. In June 1977 he was traded along with future Mets pitching coach; Dan Warthen to the Philadelphia Phillies in exchange for Wayne Twitchell & Tim Blackwell.

There backed up catchers Bob Boone & Tim McCarver, getting to two straight NLCS appearances with the NL East Champs, losing to the LA Dodgers both times.

In 1979 he was traded along with Ted Sizemore & Jerry Martin to the Chicago Cubs for Greg Gross, Manny Trillo & Dave Rader.  He spent parts of three seasons with the Cubs before going to the A.L. New York team in 1981 for Tim Flier. He got to another postseason going 0-3 losing the World Series to the LA Dodgers.

In a ten year career he played in 687 games batting .230 with 489 hits 57 HRs 103 doubles & 230 RBIs. He threw out 38% of would be base stealers in 637 games behind the plate.

Foote (right) holds back Bobby Bonilla
Post Playing Career: After his playing days he coached for the AL New York team where he was the Florida State Leagues Manager of the year in 1984. He also coached for the Blue Jays winning South Atlantic League Manager of the Year in 1987. In 1990 & 1991 he was a coach at the MLB level for the Chicago White Sox.

In 1992 he moved to the New York Mets becoming their first base coach for two seasons under managers Jeff Torborg & Dallas Green. The Mets finished fifth & last in those years.

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